Proven Ways to Feed a Fussy Eater-Mommy’s Magazine

fussy eater

Picky eating can be one of the most distressing things for parents of little kids. Fussy Eaters  are normally  between one to two years of age, and may last till they are three to five years old. In some cases, the tendency to be a fussy eater may continue up to five years of age and in very rare cases, continue to be there even when the child grows older. 

If your little one does the same and you have a harrowing time every second day getting her/ him to eat, worry not, as there is a set of solutions that you can implement and heave a sigh of relief. 

All you need to do is to first understand the fact that children being children, do not think like us adults, and are not aware of benefits of healthy eating. They would rather eat what makes them happy rather than think what’s healthy. You need to be patient, give them time and very importantly, be innovative during mealtimes. 

Well, here are a few tips and tricks that can help you tide over the problem that afflicts parents of fussy eaters the world over (dealing with it as per kids’ age):

Kids Aged One to Two-  Discovering Flavours of Life

 

This is the earliest age group of kids who earn the reputation of being a fussy eater. Children at this phase are just discovering the habits, need and wonders of eating solid foods. While this phase of fussy eaters may seem too early to get them to understand what they’re doing is not right, you need to communicate it in a simple, understandable way. Children are receptive to most the behaviours and emotions, so they will understand that refusing to eat is not acceptable.

No Arguing and Pushing:

This may be well be called the golden rule when it comes to tackling your fussy eater. Pushing children to do something too much puts them off, and if they are forced to eat what they don’t like will make things all the more undesirable. 

Do what you Preach:

You should endorse what you ask children to do (eat). Therefore, eating healthy and doing all the things you’re asking them to do will motivate them to eat what you serve.

Let your Child Feel Like a Decision-Maker:

Right from the time you start preparing food, involve your child in the process; make your little one decide what should be there on the menu, what goes where on her/ his plate (e.g. peas at the left, potatoes at the right, oats/ rice in the centre, etc.), and make foods look colourful and appealing. Also, when kids are shown they are trusted enough by letting them to eat themselves, they warm up to eating even more. 

A Mix of Yummy and not so Yummy:

If you serve what children like and what they don’t like much together, chances are they will eventually also eat what they don’t like much. It’s a trick that’s known to work quite well.

Avoid Bribing and Threatening:

Some parents offer a reward like  sweet goodies every time children eat food, or threaten or get angry if they refuse food. Neither of the strategies work, and they are best avoided. Instead, keep in mind that children have a small appetite and don’t eat equal amount everyday, and will come and tell you directly if they are hungry. 

Keep offering Foods Rejected Previously:

Don’t give up on foods that children refuse in first or second go itself. Persevere gently by presenting it to them consistently as eventually, they come around to reacting positively and try eating them.

Make Children Dine in a Group if Possible:

Children love doing things with other kids, including eating meals. That way, they’re also more likely to eat better and more as eating in the company of their peers becomes fun.

Watch out for other Reasons for Refusing Food:

Sometimes, children may not eat due to a genuine reason. If your child is ill, tired or upset over something, she/ he will refuse to eat. You need to have patience and wait for some time when that happens as forcing them to eat when they’re not in the right state of mind will not work.Some parents expect their children to eat well even when they are down with fever.Imagine how you feel when you are ill. Do you feel like eating?Don’t force feed when a child is ill. 

Try ‘Food Chaining’:

This technique is smart and easy to pull off too. Food chaining simply means introducing similar foods in succession to children so they get accustomed to each recipe one by one (e.g. French Fries to baked potato puffs to mashed potatoes to spicy potato sabji) as they taste familiar and start liking all of them gradually.

Here is a food chart to offer the right foods:

Food chart for 1 to 2 year old toddlers

 

Two to Three-Year Old : More Experienced and wiser!

 

Kids who are above two years of age are naturally more aware of things, have tried out many more recipes and know their minds better. Their physical growth at this stage slows down a bit, which happens after the first year of life. As a result, children at this stage need lesser energy for growth. 

For children in this age bracket, well, you can apply most of the tips given for one-year old and also follow the pointers given below: 

Take Kids out for Grocery Shopping:

Try taking your little ones out while shopping for groceries, talk to them as you would to elders while shopping and encourage  them to pick a few things too. It makes children feel they are big and happy as they picked something, which they are more likely to cook with and eat.

Get them to View Cooking (involve them in simple tasks too):

This technique also works great as children love feeling they are independent and handle things like grown-ups. Also, get your children to be a part of the process of coking by delegating simple tasks (like mixing ingredients,  mixing ingredients or laying the table), which they’ll surely enjoy doing.. 

As children grow older, try to make them feel like responsible members of the family. Explain that being big also involves eating healthy and being positive towards healthy food.

Give them a variety of foods

Yes. That means you need to put in more work. But your children need the right amount of nutrition from a wide variety of foods. Make sure you serve them fruits, veggies as per the suggested food pyramid and not just mundane food everyday.Toss some pasta with veggies, give them a mixed fruit salad, boiled pulses and legumes and also their favourite cheesy sandwiches.Your fussy eater  will not get bored of the ‘same old stuff ‘ everyday.

Here is a food chart to get started:Food chart for 2 to 3 year old

Remember, its just a phase. If you are patient and consistent in your efforts to feed your fussy eater the right stuff,later years will be easy. Give scope to some exceptions, but never give in to your child’s unreasonable demands for fries, chocolates and bakery products.Take up the challenge to feed your child right and your ‘ fussy eaters’ will grow up to be healthy individuals.

Good luck!Happy Parenting!

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Download PDF:Food chart for 2 to 3 year

Food chart for 1 to 2 year old toddler

Read also:

Food chart for 9 months to 1 year old baby

Activities for 1 year to 18 months old toddler

9 developmental activities for 18 months to 3 year old child

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9 Thoughts to “Proven Ways to Feed a Fussy Eater-Mommy’s Magazine”

  1. And I am going to try these tricks on my Nephew!!!

  2. My kid is well past this age and never faced this but can imagine how useful this must be for other parents

  3. Vidhi Virani

    Its an extremely good post for struggling mothers to feed their kids. My son doesn’t have this problem now but i wish this post was live 2 years back when my son was little & i was facing this problem.

  4. Rashi Roy

    I am going through this phase! Glad you came up with such a detailed post on it.

  5. Noor Anand Chawla

    Wow these are some great tips! Fortunately my son is not a very fussy eater but I will share this post if people ever ask me for tips.

  6. I am going through this tough phase with my three-year-old. Thank you so much. Will try these tips definitely.

  7. My kids were never fussy eaters but lately I have noticed a change in them, they are turning 4 this November. Will surely try hacks and you never know it might do wonder. Thanks for sharing 🙂

  8. Dev Thakkar

    Thats very nice specific list of etiquettes i will definitely try this when giving training to small ones

  9. I am past that phase but yes, i have done all of these and group eating was one thing that always worked. In the evening, few parents used to take tiffin to the park where kids would play and eat. Trust me, they ate tummy full only at that time of that day.. Gradually with school and formal environment, it got better but at 4 years, i experience speed breakers every now and then.

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